Bialosky / Ohio Desk Team Wins People’s Choice Award at Product Runway

Event Newstand

It took six designers three months of planning and countless hours of creating, but the Bialosky + Partners / Ohio Desk team took home the People’s Choice Award at the IIDA Cleveland Akron hosted Product Runway 2015!

image10

Our team, consisting of Mandisa Gosa (Bialosky + Partners), Sandy Weigel (Bialosky + Partners), Jen Hlavin (Bialosky + Partners), Raina Hooper (Ohio Desk), Maria Asser (Ohio Desk) and model Hallie DelVillan (Bialosky + Partners), competed against an astonishing 27 rival teams at Product Runway held at the Cleveland Museum of Art on Friday, May 1st. Our team worked with manufacturer representatives Donna DeCarlo (Ohio Desk), Stephen Stefancin (Coalesse) and Duane Cardamone (Designtex) – without their support none of this would have been possible!

PowerPoint Presentation

Our inspiration board – 1960s Modern inspired by wireframe furniture and bold colors of the era.

IMG_1149

The final Bialosky + Partners | Ohio Desk design on the Runway!

Our Final Design, inspired by both the historic location of this year’s event and the 60’s Mod fashion era, had the primary objective of creating something that mixed the past ideas of 60’s Mod with today’s fashion trends. We selected an array of textiles in bright, eye catching colors like magenta, yellow and teal from our sponsor, Designtex. Our design also featured an indoor/outdoor stool seat from Coalesse called the Emu Re-Trouvé Pouf. Not only was this furniture piece funky and creative, it was also very appropriate as the design of the stool was inspired by the meeting of the present and the past: nostalgic design from the fifties with its curls and spirals combined with modern production.  We also had several accessories including an intricate necklace consisting of hand-made fabric beads.

It was an exciting event (and a great party!), with over 1,000 people in the atrium at Cleveland Museum of Art to see all the designs. See the gallery on Facebook here, and to see all the fun that went on in the Photobooth before the show – click here.

1486627_10153217915412777_8364227417659232449_n

11218768_10153217916172777_2312708998864506655_n

We also had Mariel Hemingway in the house as our celebrity judge!

The Plain Dealer covered the story over the weekend – featuring our design! – Plain Dealer Article

Congrats again to all of the winners & Thanks to all that came to support our team!!

The Winner's Circle, with Best of Show in the Center!

The Winner’s Circle, with Best of Show in the Center!

The Year of the Advocate: Pro Bono and the Genius Loci

Pro bono, civic, and community projects have always been deeply embedded in the culture of our firm. We wholeheartedly believe that as architects, we have a distinct responsibility to serve and strengthen our community. But the value of pro bono work runs deeper than the neighborhoods it touches, it has transformed and elevated our very profession. Pro bono projects are a powerful medium for architectural firms to grow and empower leadership and heighten awareness of local expertise that can often be overshadowed. Too often we hear bemoaning around awarding projects to outside architects.

LeBron said it best, “In Northeast Ohio, nothing is given. Everything is earned. You work for what you have.” In Cleveland, “being of this place” means rolling up your sleeves, and chasing what you want. For Cleveland architects specifically, it means fueling ourselves (and each other) to rise up, advocate for architecture, and serve our city.

Consider the following article I wrote for AIA Cleveland as a call to our local design community – to challenge the notion of pro bono work being categorized as simply “other”, “charity” or “unpaid” projects, but rather as an ingrained part of architectural practice.


AIACLE_logo

Pro Bono and the Genius Loci

Jack Bialosky, Jr., AIA Cleveland President-Elect

For AIA, this year is intended to be “the year of the advocate”. The recent national “I Look Up” ad campaign has engendered comments, both positive and negative, about architecture and advocacy (for more information on the campaign, read AIA Cleveland President Aaron Hill’s recent article Why “Looking Up” Is Important). It is good that there are strong feelings about this, especially if you ascribe to the theory that any press is good press. But more importantly, the campaign has empowered dispersed dialogues to surface as one national conversation.

Personally, I believe that every year should be the year of the advocate for architects and architecture. As President-Elect, and a fairly new comer (or late returner) to active duty in AIA Cleveland, I have been educating myself on the issues that our local members prioritize as the most relevant and important to our community. In response to our recent member survey, most of the respondents felt that one of AIA Cleveland’s most important roles was to advocate for local architects. Many architects feel they have lost power, voice and position as leaders of the built environment. Furthermore, Cleveland and Northeast Ohio have suffered for years from a low self-image which has fueled a desire for outside experts. Compounded by an economic downturn spanning half a decade, this triple-whammy has left some architects in our community feeling under-appreciated and unable to compete for important commissions in their own market.

There have been past efforts at advocacy for local architects. The Design Forum of Cleveland was founded in 2006 as a multi-disciplinary organization with the goals of improving awareness of area design professional services, increasing the consumption of area design professional services, and enhancing and sustaining the professional careers within the local design community. The forum sought to educate area leaders on the quality of available services and the economic impact of the commissions going out of town. Unfortunately, the efforts foundered when confronted by the Cleveland malaise described above; Corporate cultures that inherently value the corporation over the community at large have failed to see the connection and synergy that strengthens them both, while political authorities focused on feathering their own nests or occupied with surviving the times.

Fast forward to 2015, Cleveland has been rightfully labeled as a “Comeback City”, as a new sense of optimism pervades our town. The City of Cleveland has new momentum and the economic cycle appears to be stable and in our favor. Downtown Cleveland, no longer a ghost town at night, is experiencing a resurgence of pride from its residents. Clevelanders are feeling better about the future of their city and architects in Northeast Ohio similarly seem to be doing a bit better than years past. AIA Cleveland has new energy and engaged members in all stages of their careers. We have schools of architecture nearby who are engaged in the community and turning out great students, many of whom are choosing to stay in Northeast Ohio. Now seems like a good time to start the conversation again about local advocacy, and to develop our own virtuous cycle.

To propel the local architectural and design community to the  position of leadership and respect to which it aspires requires a concerted effort by the whole A&D community to work together in a collegial and non-self-serving manner; to strengthen and elevate the design culture of our internal community. If you want to be the best, play with the best; taking pride and ownership in our place calls for addressing challenges facing our community as thought-leaders of the issues we feel passionately about.

We become thought leaders by educating and pushing ourselves, by looking outside our own immediate surroundings, by learning from each other, and reaching out to the community at-large. I believe that local advocacy should not be the focus of our efforts, but rather the byproduct of how we lead our lives, demonstrate our creativity, navigate complex systems, solve problems, give back to and strengthen our own community.

If I look around, I see that this is happening even now in many encouraging ways, although we have never been good at bringing attention to ourselves. Just as it has taken many years for Cleveland to begin to understand its place as a world-class, second tier city, it may take a long time to establish Cleveland architects in the appropriate place in the hearts and minds of our fellow Clevelanders. That’s no reason to stop trying.

I recently learned about a Not For Profit group in San Francisco called Public Architecture http://www.publicarchitecture.org/, who propose that firms donate 1% of their firm hours towards pro bono work and track these efforts* . I started thinking about this and wondered what percent of effort Northeast Ohio architectural firms are already donating pro bono to charity, faith-based, community development, or public policy agencies. My guess is it exceeds 1% of firm hours- Let’s find out and demonstrate that we are the geniuses loci.

* Bialosky + Partners Architects exceeds this benchmark set by “The 1% Project”, donating 2% of their firm hours annually towards pro bono work.

Canstruction: Bialosky takes home People’s Choice Award!

BPA would like to thank our sponsors for their generous donations. Thanks to their help we were able to raise $4,390 and purchase over 4,188 cans of food to donate to the Greater Cleveland Food Bank during their Harvest for Hunger Campaign! These cans combined with the rest of the teams’ structures, will provide a record breaking number of over 32,800 cans to Northeast Ohio’s Hunger Relief.

This year, our sculpture was given the People’s Choice Award! With the theme of “Childhood Board Games”, our team created the “GO” corner of a Monopoly board loaded with a house, hotel, hat player’s piece and shoe player’s piece made of 4,188+ cans. Our Monopoly board contained a variety of foods such as potatoes, pork & beans, black beans and salmon as well as “super foods” including tuna and vegetables.

Logo Monopoly

Monopoly was created during the height of the Great Depression by a man who simply wanted to entertain his friends and loved ones. While the Great Depression is long since over, poverty is still a prevalent issue today. According to the Greater Cleveland Food Bank, one in six people are food insecure – meaning they may not know where their next meal will come from. With our contribution this year, we hope to “PASS GO” on hunger!

Enjoy some photos from the event including all of the great sculptures this year!
Note: Please hover your mouse over the images below to navigate the slideshow:

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

Designer Insights with Mandisa Gosa

Last week, Terry’s Fabrics interviewed Bialosky+ Parnters Interior Designer, Mandisa Gosa – asking her 5 big questions about inspiration, the creative process, and advice for up-and-coming designers.

Designer Insights with Mandisa Gosa

Courtesy of: Terry’s Fabrics UK

– Transcript –

1) In your own words describe your unique style and creative aesthetic?

Modern with Global Funk. I gravitate towards environments that are overall quiet and modern but have layered elements of vivid color and playful moments. A style of self-expression.

2) When starting a new project, what is your creative process?

I like to establish a working relationship with a client that is built on trust. From that point it’s a matter of narrowing in on their aesthetic, likes and dislikes; bouncing ideas off fellow designers and looking for inspiration for design development.

3) Out of the creative people you have worked with, who is it that you respect and admire the most?

I work with many extremely talented people each with their own unique design aesthetic. I respect and admire all who are able to express themselves through a positive outlet.

4) When looking for inspiration is there a particular thing you do to get inspired?

Inspiration comes from everywhere: books, magazines, art, and nature. A lot of inspiration comes from my children, nieces and nephews. They have the natural ability to be fearless and unbound when it comes to creative expression.

5) What has brought you to this point in your career? And what is your advice for people looking to follow in your footsteps?

I am at this point in my career due to determination, self-confidence with an approachable leadership style, and grace. My piece of advice would be to follow the path that brings you the most joy; but be open to the guidance and knowledge that others have to share.

CANstruction Season is Here!

Bialosky + Partners Architects (BPA) is excited to once again participate in this year’s Cleveland 2015 Canstruction Design/Build competition, which benefits the Cleveland Foodbank during their Harvest for Hunger Campaign. Canstruction, a national charity of the design and construction industry created by the Society of Design Administration, is devoted to increasing public perception of hunger through gallery-style sculpture of canned goods in public locations. (Below please find photos of BPA structures from previous years.)

With the help of our sponsors last year:

  • BPA raised a total of $5,750!
  • Our sculpture included over 6,900 canned goods, all of which have been donated to the Cleveland Foodbank.
  • Constructing our sculpture took 4 hours & 14 team members
  • For the second year in a row, our team’s sculpture, “The Hollywood Hills”, was given the title “Can-Spirit” for most amount of cans and team enthusiasm!

Last year’s Canstruction took us to Hollywood!

As always we would like to go above and beyond our goals from previous years and aim for a sculpture that consists of 7,000+ cans (or raise approx. $6,000)! We respectfully request your support for this important Cleveland event with a donation of $250-500 as a company or $50.00 as an individual. However, your generosity at any amount will be greatly appreciated as we try and reach our goal. Your contributions will be recognized on signage next to our sculpture during the exhibit and featured in our BPA Cleveland Design Blog (http://www.bialosky.com/blog).  Please follow the link below to place a donation to help us build our structure!

Donate Button with Credit Cards

This year’s theme is “Childhood Board Games” and our sculpture will be on display beginning March 20th. We kindly request any assistance you could provide by Monday, March 2, 2015.

Please accept our gratitude for your time, thought, and consideration. We look forward to the potential collaboration with you for this charitable event.

Thank you to last year’s sponsors!